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Primary Education & Coding: Too much or a step in the right direction for future British prosperity?

We provide a high level of education to contribute to the future growth and development of the economy. We teach a wide range of subjects from an early age to ensure that all industry sectors are supplied with industry experts. We teach I.T to make children technically savvy from a young to run parallel with the expansion of the digital economy.

The UK’s digital economy is thriving at an incredible rate, now estimated to contribute roughly £100bn to it (http://www.techcityuk.com/investors/).

But why are we now starting to teach children to code…?

…and the answer is this. App development plays a significant role in the UK’s economy, reported to have generated around £4bn in revenue in 2014, and has more than likely grown since (http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jun/26/uk-apps-economy-worth-four-billion-pounds). This now takes us on to the main topic in discussion, below.

A couple of weeks ago we were directed to an article on the CBeebies section on the BBC website. Although smothered in easy-on-the-eye imagery it actually addressed a somewhat adult topic; Computer ‘Coding’ is NOW an official component of the national curriculum within primary schools.

Despite being in the government’s pipeline for quite some time it’s officially been rolled out, and primary schools are as we speak teaching kids how to ‘code’. Personally we feel it’s an absolute delight for all of us that we have the technology to mandate such curriculum, interestingly the first in the world to do so, but not all will welcome this.

Inevitably being an app and website development company means that there’s going to be an element of biasness on offer, but let’s take a look at the comments we think this news will generate.

 

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Firstly it’s important to understand that what being taught isn’t coding as typically generalised; tuning in with no food, drink and human interaction as portrayed in David Fincher’s ‘The Social Network’.

It’s actually a stepping stone to learning useful life skills. Project planning, management and execution are the key skills being taught here, which are appropriately filtered down into simple consumable commodities suitable for a five year olds attentional span. And it’s a pretty impressive skill to have at such a young age!

It’s also worth a mention that Barclays Bank have also shown their support for the scheme by offering complimentary 2-hour coding sessions for children aged 7-17.

What Else?

It’s been mentioned by some that pupils at this age should be learning the core subjects i.e., mathematics and science. But let’s wait one second, surely coding integrates both of them…right?

Something else very interesting about ‘coding’ is that it teaches you how to create rather than just consume. Like thoroughly enjoying a particular song but actually being able to put the components together to create it yourself.

One of our Senior Software Developers, Kyle, started learning the basics of how to operate a computer when he was 2. He says it has proven to be a huge contributor to him establishing his career path, conveniently during a point in time when digital marketing is booming!

Now the criticisms…

It could be argued that ‘coding’ will lead to kids wanting more ‘screen time’ during times when they should be playing and/or learning other subjects. Our response to this is…find a healthy balance between screen-time focused lessons, i.e., IT and the other core subjects.

It could also be perceived to be too advanced for the average 5 year old. However measures are in place to ensure that every level of ‘coding’ taught throughout the school years matches the development levels of the recipients.

All in all, we feel that in a digitally advanced era there’s no harm in giving schoolkids a slight head start. Especially in a society which is inevitably going to become digitally dependent.

Do you agree?

Have you got any questions on coding? Want to speak to someone about your digital marketing strategy? If so, feel free to get in touch via our website or through Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Or give us a call on +44  (0)1737 45 77 83

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Introducing Our New Digital Marketer & Content Writer – James Tee

We have yet another new starter at Big Orange Software in what has been a very busy 2015 so far!

Our impressive track record of technical knowledge, customer care & operations continues to be the main drive behind our expansion in our office in Reigate.

We are now pleased to welcome James Tee as our newest member of staff, who will be working on the marketing & content writing team. As a newly established position James will ensure that your product will reach those who matter most, your customers!

Professional Experience

James has recently come from a PR background and has extensive experience in content marketing and social media campaigns for clients such a Mercedes-Benz, Ralph Lauren and Rolex.

James has always had a passion for writing and has had a few articles published for his local newspaper when he was 16 years old.  Nowadays James likes to use his way with words to help brands reach out and connect with their clients to increase publicity and engagement.

About James

James is a keen explorer and has travelled around Europe on two occasions with nothing but a train ticket, a backpack and a much-too-folded map in hand. He is also a keen sportsman and will give anything a go, however his favourite sports are football, tennis and badminton.

He also enjoys the casual game of croquet in the summertime too…

Contact James

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If you’d like to contact James with any queries in mind, you can get him on his email which is james.tee@bigorangesoftware.com or contact him via LinkedIn.

Welcome to Big Orange Software, James!

The 2015 UK Solar Eclipse – Stay Smart, Stay Away From Smart!

As the UK prepares for the first solar eclipse since 1999, we at Big Orange Software urge you, rather controversially, to stay away from all things tech… Billed as the most spectacular partial eclipse for decades, it’s inevitable that social media engagement is going to boom during the two-hour event, but let’s face it nothing is going to be as spectacular as the main event itself.

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‘That’ concert regret comes to mind here; when you’re at your first ever gig and get overwhelmed by the sheer excitement of it and feel the need to record EVERY SINGLE song on your device. You then leave the venue with your ears buzzing to then be addressed with sheer disappointment when you find that the recording resembles a somewhat crunching noise, with thousands of screams in the backdrop.

What we’re trying to say here is, don’t miss the moment by trying to capture it.

We forecast that Facebook, Twitter & Instagram are more than likely going to be the big hitters this Friday, flooded with images of ‘Eclipse Selfies’, Jaffa Cake ‘Total Eclipse’ jokes and hazy images of the sky, but these may come at a price…

Photographing the sun can cause damage to cameras if the right steps aren’t taken. The lens in your camera can get damaged by the sun, it’s advised that photographers use a solar filter should you want to record.

So whether you’re at work, at home or even at your local GP practise waiting room. Sit back, put away the device and simply enjoy… …and then Tweet like mad!

Facts For Our Followers

  • The alignment will see the moon pass directly between the sun and earth between 8.30AM and 10.42AM, reaching its peak at 9.34AM
  • Northern Scotland will have the best view, with the likes of Shetland seeing almost 98 per cent of sun covered, Glasgow 94 per cent and London 84 per cent
  • One of the earliest recorded eclipses was the Ugarit eclipse in 1374BC which took place in Northern Syria